Monday, April 7, 2008

Jean Monnet Working Paper

I'm on this mailing list from the NYU Jean Monnet Center. It looks like it might be kind of interesting to look into "the slow and at times controversial process of 'Europeanizing' the Italian legal system."

Dear friends of the Jean Monnet Center,

We are pleased to announce the online publication of the first paper in the 2008 Jean Monnet Working Paper series. We include the abstract of this paper below:

Silvana Sciarra, "Trusting Judges to Deliver Changes: Italy, the EU and Labour Law" (JMWP no. 1/08)

The paper looks into the slow and at times controversial process of 'Europeanising' the Italian legal system, in order to exemplify how adaptation to changes takes place within entire branches of the state administration. Three examples are selected, all within the domain of labour law: state aid illegally granted to support training and work experience contracts; fixed term labour contracts in the public sector; free movement of foreign language assistants. Multi-level regulatory techniques are at the origin of adaptation, geared by institutional and quasi-institutional actors. The main emphasis is on national judges engaging in a dialogue with the ECJ and delivering changes into the legal order as a whole.

We invite you to access this Working Paper on the Jean Monnet Center website at www.jeanmonnetprogram.org.


We just got a half a foot of snow dumped on us last night! Dang, and we were under the delusion that it was spring here already.

2 comments:

Bobby said...

It is spring in Kansas and the stormy season introduced itself by delivering a big hale storm over night. In spite of an overnight low temp of 50°, nickel size hale stones were still in evidence on the ground at 10 AM this morning.

With the emphasis on "...national judges engaging in a dialogue with the ECJ and delivering changes into the legal order as a whole.", the courts are playing an activist role. I guess if you can't get enough demonstrators to march and demand change, you have to resort to more direct methods.

Or, maybe that would focus too much attention on their evil scheme.

Its always amazing to see how clearly the truth is often presented, yet no one knows anything about it.

the tent lady said...

Yeah I wish I had the time to study at Jean Monnet's school. As the official "architect" of the EU his history deserves an entire article.

I think hail is amazing! Was in Wyoming in 2003 for the big storm that wiped out entire car lots across the Dakotas and when it hit the Big Horns it was big as golf balls! I ran out into it but learned fast how much it hurts!